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Awards

Harm Reduction International presents a number of awards at our international conference to acknowledge the contributions of outstanding groups or individuals in the fields of drug use, health and human rights.

Nominations for 2023 recipients is now open. View each section, below, for further details on selection criteria, to see previous winners and to submit your nomination.

HR23 awards nominations will close at 23.59 GMT on 31 December 2022.

If you have any questions about awards nominations, or issues with online submission, please contact us.

Email conference team

Timeline

August 2022: Awards nominations open

31 December 2022: Awards nominations close

January/February 2022: Evaluation by Selection Committees

April 2022: Winners announced at HR23


This award was first presented at the ‘3rd International Conference on the Reduction of Drug Related Harm’ in Melbourne in 1992 and is given to an individual, group or organisation that has made an outstanding contribution to harm reduction at an international level.

The award aims to recognise work in any of the following areas:

  • Harm reduction programming and practice
  • Harm reduction policy
  • Advocacy for harm reduction
  • Harm reduction teaching and training
  • Science, research or critical thinking relevant to harm reduction
  • Provision of funding or resources for harm reduction

There is no cash prize for this award; the winner will be presented with a trophy and will have their name listed on the HRI website. The top scoring nominees will be listed in the HR23 programme and website.

Nomination criteria

Nominations are invited for individuals, groups or organisations working at the community level, national and/or international levels.

The following criteria, with a focus on ‘international significance,’ will be considered and assessed in reviewing the nominees:

  • Contribution of the work to protection of health, dignity and human rights of people who use drugs at the international level
  • Pioneering nature of work
  • Courage or leadership in the face of adversity
  • Length of time working in the field
  • Potential for award to strengthen work
  • Potential for award to enhance visibility and public awareness of issue
  • Quality of nomination (Is it complete, easy to understand and are letters of support included?)

Submit nomination for International Rolleston Award


Background

The award is named after Sir Humphry Rolleston, President of the Royal College of Physicians who chaired the UK Departmental Committee on Morphine and Heroin Addiction. In 1926 the committee concluded that the prescription of heroin or morphine could be regarded as legitimate medical treatment for those who required it – a decision that epitomises a benign, pragmatic and humane approach to drug problems, and was a landmark event in the history of harm reduction.

Previous Winners

  • 2019 Andrey Rylkov Foundation (Russia)
  • 2017 Péter Sárosi and István Gábor Takács (Hungary)
  • 2015 Edo Augustian Nasution (Indonesia)
  • 2013 Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch (Poland/USA)
  • 2011 Jude Byrne (Australia) and Rich Needle (USA)
  • 2010 Gerry Stimson (UK)
  • 2009 Ralf Jurgens (Canada) and Sam Friedman (USA)
  • 2008 Andrew Ball (Australia)
  • 2007 Vladimir Mendelevich (Russia)
  • 2006 Robert Newman (USA)
  • 2005 Zunyou Wu (China)
  • 2004 Anya Sarang (Russia)
  • 2003 Ambros Uchtenhagen (Switzerland)
  • 2002 Ethan Nadelmann (USA)
  • 2001 Fabio Mesquita (Brazil)
  • 2000 Pat O'Hare (Italy)
  • 1999 Jean-Paul Grund (Netherlands)
  • 1998 Nick Crofts (Australia)
  • 1997 Luigi Ciotti (Italy)
  • 1996 Aaron Peak (Nepal)
  • 1995 Anne Coppell (France)
  • 1994 Alex Wodak (Australia)
  • 1993 Ernie Drucker (USA)
  • 1992 Dave Purchase (on behalf of North American Syringe Exchange, USA)


The National Rolleston Award is given to an individual, group or organisation that has made an outstanding contribution to harm reduction in the conference host country. For HR23, all nominations for this award must come from Australia.

The award aims to recognise work in any of the following areas:

  • Harm reduction programming and practice
  • Harm reduction policy
  • Advocacy for harm reduction
  • Harm reduction teaching and training
  • Science, research or critical thinking relevant to harm reduction
  • Provision of funding or resources for harm reduction

There is no cash prize for this award; the winner will be presented with a trophy and will have their name listed on the HRI website. The top scoring nominees will be listed in the HR23 programme and website.

Nomination criteria

Nominations are invited for individuals, groups or organisations working at the community level, national and/or international levels.

The following criteria, with a focus on ‘national significance,’ will be considered and assessed in reviewing the nominees:

  • Contribution of the work to protection of health, dignity and human rights of people who use drugs at the national level
  • Pioneering nature of work in host country
  • Courage or leadership in the face of adversity
  • Length of time working in the field
  • Potential for award to strengthen work
  • Potential for award to enhance visibility and public awareness of issue
  • Quality of nomination (Is it complete, easy to understand and are letters of support included?)

Submit nomination for National Rolleston Award


Background

The award is named after Sir Humphry Rolleston, President of the Royal College of Physicians who chaired the UK Departmental Committee on Morphine and Heroin Addiction. In 1926 the committee concluded that the prescription of heroin or morphine could be regarded as legitimate medical treatment for those who required it – a decision that epitomises a benign, pragmatic and humane approach to drug problems, and was a landmark event in the history of harm reduction.

Previous Winners

  • 2019 Consumidores Associados Sobrevivem Organizados (CASO) (Portugal)
  • 2017 Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) (Canada)
  • 2015 Malaysian AIDS Council (Malaysia)
  • 2011 Elie Aaraj (Lebanon)
  • 2010 Russell Newcombe (UK)
  • 2009 Thai Drug Users’ Network (TDN) Founders (Thailand)
  • 2008 Àmbit Prevenció (Spain)
  • 2007 Marek Zygadlo (Poland)
  • 2006 The Drug User Advisory Group (Canada)
  • 2005 Des Flannagan (Northern Ireland)
  • 2004 Tony Trimingham (Australia)
  • 2003 Mae Chan Project (Thailand)
  • 2002 Tatja Kostnapfel-Rihtar (Slovenia)
  • 2001 Jimmy Dorabjee (India)
  • 2000 Mike Wavell (Jersey)
  • 1999 André Seidenberg (Switzerland)
  • 1998 Tarcisio Andrade (Brazil)
  • 1997 Alain Mucchielli (France)
  • 1996 The Australian IV League (Australia)
  • 1995 San Giuliano Unità di Strada (Italy)
  • 1994 Catherine Hankins (Canada)
  • 1993 Wijnand Mulder (Netherlands)
  • 1992 Les Drew (Australia)


This award has been presented each year since 2005 to a person who either used to, or currently uses drugs, and who has made an outstanding contribution to reducing drug-related harm.

There is no cash prize for this award; the winner will receive a scholarship to attend HR23, will be presented with a trophy and will have their name listed on the HRI website. The top scoring nominees will be listed in the HR23 programme and website.

Nomination criteria

Nominations are invited for individuals, groups or organisations working at the community level, national and/or international levels.

The following criteria will be considered and assessed in reviewing the nominees:

  • Contribution to the promotion and implementation of harm reduction practices
  • Contribution of the work to protection of health, dignity and human rights of people who use drugs
  • Courage or leadership in the face of adversity
  • Length of time working in the field
  • Potential for award to strengthen work
  • Potential for award to enhance visibility and public awareness of issue
  • Quality of nomination (Is it complete, easy to understand and are letters of support included?)

Submit nomination for Carol & Travis Jenkins Award


Background

The award was initially named after Travis Jenkins, an extraordinary jazz musician and composer who died of cancer in 2004. In 2009, the award was renamed to include the name of Travis’s wife, Carol, who worked for many years with the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research as a medical anthropologist, and was one of the leading instigators to setting up the National Aids Council. Carol Jenkins was renowned for her research into sexual behaviour and was a leading expert on HIV/AIDS. Equally important was her connection with the Hagahai people of Papua New Guinea, who were her second family.

Previous Winners

  • 2019 Andrii Yarovyi (Ukraine)
  • 2017 Lee Hertel (USA)
  • 2015 Abdur Raheem Rajaey (Afghanistan)
  • 2013 Loon Gangte (India)
  • 2011 Tam Miller (Scotland)
  • 2010 Joergen Kjaer (Denmark)
  • 2009 Holly Bradford (USA)
  • 2008 Theo van Dam (Netherlands)
  • 2007 Alexandra (Sasha) Volgina (Russia)
  • 2006 Jason Farrell (USA)
  • 2005 Paisan Suwannawong (Thailand)


The Centre on Drug Policy Evaluation (CDPE - formerly the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy) launched the Brooklyn McNeil Rae of Hope Award at HR17 in Montreal, to honour the best scientific abstract in the area of harm reduction or drug policy. The aim of the award is to encourage high-quality scientific research to support evidence-based advocacy efforts in drug policy reform. The winner receives a waiver to publish in the peer-reviewed open-access Harm Reduction Journal, as well as AUD $830.

The award is named after Brooklyn Rae McNeil, a vocal advocate for safer injection sites and a vital support in the lives of many people who use drugs in Toronto, Canada. As a harm reduction activist whose life was cut too short as a result of an opioid overdose, Brooklyn’s spirit serves as an unwavering reminder of the need to conduct research and evidence-based advocacy to prevent the senseless loss of lives that could be avoided with drug policies grounded in evidence and human rights.

Previous Winners

  • 2019 - Marielle Marcaida (Philippines) - “Understanding the Narratives of Pateros Mothers’ Activism under the Philippine Drug War”
  • 2017 - Elaine Hyshka (Canada) – “A comparative analysis of provincial and territorial harm reduction policy in Canada”


New for 2023, this award is named for Gill Bradbury, who passed away in 2020. Gill was our inimitable Conference Medical Coordinator.

A force of nature, Gill was brilliant to work with. Gill went above and beyond to care for our delegates. Despite always being on duty, Gill was the life and soul of the after hours party. Gill is irreplaceable at our conference and in our hearts.

The Gill Bradbury Award will be awarded to an individual, group or organisation providing excellent services to people who use drugs. The inaugural award, to be presented in 2023, will have a special focus on superlative service provision during the COVID-19 pandemic.


There is no cash prize for this award; the winner will be presented with a trophy and will have their name listed on the HRI website. The top scoring nominees will be listed in the HR23 programme and website.

Nominations are invited for individuals, groups or organisations working at the community level, national and/or international levels.

Submit nomination for Gill Bradbury Award

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